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Sexual Health


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Sexual Health


 

Empowering people with the tools and resources to make informed decision about their own health. We do this through HIV, HEP C, and STBBI education, prevention and support. 

 

Sexual health is the experience of the ongoing process of physical, psychological, and sociocultural well-being related to sexuality. Sexual health is evidenced in the free and responsible expressions of sexual capabilities that foster harmonious personal and social wellness, enriching individual and social life. It is not merely the absence of dysfunction, disease and/or infirmity. For sexual health to be attained and maintained it is necessary that the sexual rights of all people be recognized and upheld.
— World Health Organization
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Sexually Transmitted Infections


Sexually Transmitted Infections


A sexually transmitted infection (STI) is an infection that can be transmitted from one person to another through sexual contact (exchange of semen, vaginal fluid, blood or other fluids). A blood borne infection is transmitted through contact with infected blood. Blood borne infections (BBI) are transmitted by contact with contaminated blood.  Some infections (for example HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C) may be transmitted through both sexual and blood borne transmission.

 

Learn more about:

 

Where to get testing?

HIV only

HIV antibodies may take three to six months to appear in the blood. It is recommended to wait approximately three months after being exposed before getting tested. If you get tested before and the results are negative, you will need to be tested again later to be certain that you do not have HIV. To get tested:

Consult your family doctor

or

Consult an afterhours clinic

or

Contact the Anonymous Testing Clinic (Public Health) (506) 869-6907*

*Please note that this phone is only answered between 9 am and 5 pm. There is no voicemail or phone message during off hours. This service is for HIV testing only.

 

STIs Testing

When going for testing, specify if you want to be tested for HIV and Hepatitis C as the doctor might not test for it unless they believe you are in the high risk group. Testing can include a blood or urine sample. You will need to make a follow up appointment for results. To get tested:

Consult your family doctor

or

Consult an afterhours clinic such as:

  • Primacy- Main Street Family Medical Clinic : (506) 854-8805. 165 Main Street, Moncton
  • Primacy – Trinity Medical Clinic : (506) 854-0133. 89 Trinity Drive, Moncton
  • Salvus Clinic (if you have no family doctor): (506) 384-7284. 22 Church Street, Suite T190, Moncton
  • Sexual Health Clinic (Under 19 y/o only): (506) 856-3310. 81 Albert Street, Moncton

 

For more locations:

 

Most STIs have little or no symptoms; the only way to know is to get tested!

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Safer sex practices


Safer sex practices


To practice safer sex:

  • Use a latex or polyurethane condom correctly every time you have vaginal or anal sex.
  • Use only water-based or silicone-based  (Oil-based lubricants can make latex condoms break.)
  • Get tested for STIs regularly. Having an STI increases your risk of getting and passing on HIV.
  • Avoid sharing sex toys, and if you do, cover each one with a new condom before each use. It is also important to clean your toys between vaginal and anal use.
  • Use a condom or dental dam every time you have oral sex.
  • Choose forms of sexual stimulation that pose little or no risk for HIV, like masturbation or sensual massage.

* This content was originally published by CATIE, Canada’s source for HIV and hepatitis C information. http://catie.ca/en/basics

Condoms and Their Use in Preventing HIV Infection and Other STIs

  • Condoms must be used consistently and correctly to provide maximum protection
  • Condoms are effective in preventing HIV and other STIs (Sexually Transmitted Infections).
  • Condoms users have product options
  • Education about condom efficacy does not promote sexual activity
  • Abstinence is most effective in the prevention against HIV and other STIs

Basic “CONDOM SENSE”

Latex condoms can protect from HIV, sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy.

One: Keep a supply of latex condoms, in a safe, cool, dry place. Check expiry date before use. Open packet carefully.

Two: As soon as the penis is hard, put the condom on with the rolled-up ring on the outside. Keep the end gently pinched leaving space at the tip to hold semen.

Three: Unroll the condom gently all the way down to the hair.

Four: If additional lubrication is required, use a water-based lubricant. Do not use oil-based lubricants, i.e. Vaseline, massage oil, butter, etc. (Nonoxynol-9 products may cause irritation during vaginal sex, and should never be used for anal sex).

Five: Pull out slowly after ejaculation, holding condom firmly at the base of the hard penis. Move the penis well away from your partner and carefully remove the condom.

Six: Wrap condom in a tissue and throw away in the garbage. Do not flush! Never reuse a condom.

Prevention is the only way to stop the spread of HIV! You can get condoms from both the Sexual Health Center and AIDS Moncton.

* This content was originally published by CATIE, Canada’s source for HIV and hepatitis C information. http://catie.ca/en/basics